Newspaper Task

Fri 28th Oct

Crop Brief:

“Taking the provided newspaper, discuss the visual content and its relationship to the context of the articles within the printed pages.”

Consider the following:

  • Target audience
  • Overall design
  • Role of the images in communication (implicit and explicit)
  • Relationship of image and text (headlines)
  • Cropping (have the images been cropped? Is the image a true representation of content?)

Choose 5 of the most significant images within the pages, print out and place on A2 page. Present images and their role in relation to implicit and explicit and if they’re a true representation of the articles content.

TASK COMPLETED IN A GROUP OF 5

Newspaper: The Sun

Target audience: young/middle aged; working class; stereotypically uneducated

Overall design: News is summarised; loads of adverts; comical design; messy/cheap design; gossip

Implicit/explicit: mostly explicit; most headlines are explicit; prioritises different stories; can be misleading in placement of stories/images

Relationship of images and text (headlines): most are cropped/overlaid; headlines mostly relate to images; misleading sometimes

20161031_130736

Group mind map of ideas for the The Sun.

20161031_130803

Image of A2 page of images taken from The Sun.

We selecting the main parts of the newspaper that we felt best describe what it was about. Of course we choose ‘page 3’, known for its explicit images of women; it’s a lot more toned down now compared to what it used to be but the article is completely unrelated to the image shown. It is a massive photo of a women in her bikini, which would lead you to believe that it was about her on holiday but no, the article is in fact about the show Strictly Come Dancing – which this woman dances on – and all they’ve done is put a small image of her in the show which is completely misleading and not exactly the easiest thing to see – making you more focused on her on the beach.

The article about Candice is in true media style. All the photos they’ve chosen to use do actually relate to the article, but instead of focusing on her win and how positive that is, they’ve made it in to a negative and chosen to write an article about her ‘pout’ and how she’s been receiving abuse online about it.

Another point we noticed was there prioritising of news. (Talking about the larger cut-out of the man in the middle on the image of the A2 page.) On each end of the page, they are talking about very serious issues – a bomb attack and an abuser finally being jailed – but in the middle, the largest part of the page, they are talking about how men ‘get off’ by sexting Siri – the digital talk device on iPhones. You’d think that something like a bomb attack would be far more important that being told that men are sexting a virtual device but in The Sun that is not the case.

The final two cut-outs on the page have an article that is actually relating to the images shown. The one about Holly Willoughby was put onto page 3 of the newspaper so its again reinforcing this idea of what The Sun decide is more important – learning about a celebrity being drunk on a show that is aired at 10pm on a Thursday, a time where a lot of other people in the country are drunk, is clearly very important news in their eyes.

Overall, we concluded that The Sun is a very gossip-based article, prioritises news about celebrities and weird facts other than important things going on in the world. It’s a cheap newspaper, which is shown in the design with a messy layout, images taken from other newspapers/magazines or the internet and there are a lot of adverts. It was interesting to really deconstruct a newspaper and talk about the different components in the articles; I’ve learned a lot more than I already knew about how newspapers prioritise news and mislead readers.

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Author: ellenreiddesign

First year Graphic Communication student at Cardiff Metropolitan University.

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